Do you fancy a Yerba Mate?

So I’m a bit late posting this as I’m a little behind with my posts at the moment but here it is – better late than never!

So today I’m going to be talking about Yerba Mate ( yer-bah ma-tey). Have you heard of it? Well, Mate is neither a tea nor, a coffee but is a natural stimulant with tons of other health benefits (see below).

The founders Rosie and Charles cofounded Yuyo after falling in love with yerba mate on their travels in South America, so when they asked me to be a Yerba Mate ambassador and try drinking during January for their #yerbamatemission I happily agreed. And there’s also a chance to win some so you can try for yourself  – happy days!

So here’s some more about mate!

Yerba mate is neither tea nor coffee – it a real super plant, an evergreen tree native to South America, the leaves of which are consumed as an energising beverage on a daily basis by Argentineans, Uruguayans, Brazilians and Paraguayans. It offers a number of health benefits, including stimulation, hydration and metabolism boosting.
The plant contains:
– High levels of theobromine (the feel-good compound from cacao)
– Natural caffeine – about as much as a cup of filter coffee
– More antioxidants than green tea and a whole host of other micronutrients and anti-inflammatory saponins.

How do you drink it?

Take a few teaspoons of loose leaf Pure or Roasted yerba mate to cover the ball at the base of the bombilla(metal straw with sieve), then add water at about 70°C – 80°C and drink from the straw.
The first couple of washes can be a little bitter, but it gets smoother as you go. You’ll only get a few sips before you need to add water again – the idea is you keep topping it up and use the same leaves for several infusions over a period of time. Don’t leave the mate to steep in the water for too long – just drink it all and add more later. Be aware that you’re drinking it in a higher caffeine way and the caffeine is comparable to coffee, so it’s good to go easy with it!

The loose leaf can also be served simply as a hot brew in water using a teapot or other infuser (70 – 80˚C is best), or expressed through a coffee machine or an Aeropress. The Roasted can work well with your choice of milk or milk alternative as a ‘yerba mate latte’. You can try the Pure cold brewed too – it only takes about 15 minutes in iced water for a light infusion that is really refreshing.

The Yuyo bags are really straightforward – just brew them in water that is not boiling (again, 70 – 80˚C is best) for around three to five minutes, as you would with tea. Yerba mate is very low in tannins, so you shouldn’t find it becomes overbrewed.

A chance to win some and try some for yourself!

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Just comment on this post saying why you’d like to try it for a chance to win;
1) The winner will receive a Mini Mateo gourd and bombilla with some loose organic yerba mate (Pure Yerba and Roasted Yerba), plus some Yerba Zing and Yerba Mint teabags.

2) 10 runners up will receive samples of Yerba Zing and Yerba Mint.
Winners will be chosen at random on the 20th February.

You can also visit www.yuyo.co.uk/yerbamatemission to access other content such as their campaign video. Their news section has blog posts covering topics such as yerba mate’s health benefits and how to brew it in greater detail.

*Disclaimer. I’m lucky to be one of the Yuyo ambassadors so they sent me a selection of mate to try. I am no way sponsored or obliged to share this post.

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4 Comments

  1. Natasha on February 10, 2017 at 6:23 pm

    Hello Niki! I’m from Argentina and it makes really glad to see yerba mate gaining popularity in other countries! The designs of those bags (and even the brand name) are soo cute!!
    By the way, when prepared as an infusion, it’s called “mate cocido” (literally meaning ‘cooked mate’ lol) and you can add a splash of milk and some sweetener, like you would with tea, and it’s fantastic 😉

  2. Hannah on February 11, 2017 at 5:07 pm

    I really do drink gallons of tea and coffee every day, so I’d love to shake up the routine and try something different! These sound like delicious new options.

  3. Blair Chief Leaf at Big Leaf on February 15, 2017 at 9:35 am

    My favourite slant on this awesome beverage is tereré. The ‘iced tea’ version. I take this to work with me in a water bottle and as an energetic gardener, this ticks the boxes. One key benefit for me is that it appears to stave off hunger so I’ve stopped eating clients’ cats and roses. Really. I also take tereré along with me on bike rides. I pop a natural energy/carbohydrate tab into it for good measure. Delish!

    To make it couldn’t be easier. I put 6 coffee spoon measures into a tea infuser (mine is a 1.5l Japanese teapot) and let this brew for a good few minutes. Why 6 measures you ask? Well if you are into numerology, sIx is the ‘bee number’ and it symbolises industriousness, busyness and Godess-iness. Magical stuff. I reuse the Mate up to 3 times. It really is a generous ‘giving’ tea and the infusions seem almost never ending. I decant the lot into an old cider flagon. About 4 litres will last me the week.

    Try adding honey, carob syrup or agave nectar too. Fruit juice perhaps? I also like some rooibos mixed in for the occasional change. In the summer, pour your drink over a glassful of ice and add some bruised mint or lemon verbena leaves. A shot of white rum?

    You’ll need your hammock. Enjoy.

  4. Nikola on February 19, 2017 at 9:39 pm

    I am watching Barcelona with my mate gourd and thinking it would be nice if I had orange cup and some fancy yerba to share this wonderful game on sunday evening with my friends.
    Maybe Suarez will need to get some new kind of yerba 🙂

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